Has your physical therapist or chiropractor used a stainless steel tool to work on your persistent knots? If so, you’ve experienced Graston therapy.

The Graston Technique is a type of instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization (IATSM), which research has shown to be effective in improving range of motion and reducing pain.

Personally, I’ve never been a big fan of hard tools, especially if they cause bruising, but this is where things can get confusing.

In many Eastern medicine techniques (gua sha, cupping, etc.), bruising is the goal and is seen as a sign of healing. So is Graston just a watered-down, Westernized version of an ancient practice? Does it actually work?

In this week’s episode, we dive into all things Graston and instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization.

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 What you’ll lean from this episode:

  • Using tools for bodywork aka instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization
  • The history of the Graston Technique and how it works
  • How hard tools can be used safely and effectively to reduce pain and improve range of motion… without bruising

Links mentioned:


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Music by: @dcuttermusic / http://www.davidcuttermusic.com